How To File Bankruptcy The Correct Way

With the ongoing economical turmoil in the world, more and more people are considering personal bankruptcy as a viable option. It can be the only way to hold on to your home, car and other valuables. Sometimes, it is the only lifeline you have. The following article will explain personal bankruptcy and the options it may hold for you.

A huge mistake people make before filing for bankruptcy is maxing out their credit cards. This can lead to disaster when you file and the credit card companies might not discharge the debt. If you can, you need to stop using your credit cards at least six months before you file, and ideally for a year prior. Also, do your best to pay the minimum payments on these cards for at least six months before you file.

After your bankruptcy is finalized, you should begin re-building your credit by, obtaining copies of your credit reports. Your reports may show that you filed for bankruptcy, but it can take a lot of time for the credit bureaus to remove the original debt from your credit history. Check your reports over thoroughly, if there is debt showing that was discharged in a bankruptcy, you can contact the credit bureaus online, or in writing and request that the information be deleted.

An important tip regarding personal bankruptcy is, gaining an understanding of what sorts of debts can, and cannot be included in a discharge. By realizing that some obligations are not considered dischargeable under the bankruptcy code, it is possible to make a wiser, more informed choice when it comes to making the decision to file a petition.

Know the difference between Chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 will wipe your debts clean, meaning you will not owe what you file against. Chapter 13 requires you to agree to repay your debts. These debts need to be repaid within three to five years of the filing date.

Do some research. There are two main types of personal bankruptcy – Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 will eliminate the majority of your debt while Chapter 13 restructures it to give you time to pay it off. Each one has different rules on what assets you are allowed to keep. So, ask a lot of questions before you decide which one is the best fit for your situation.

Never use a paralegal to guide you through the bankruptcy process. While some paralegals may have the necessary knowledge to provide all the answers you need, they cannot give legal advice legally. Because of this, you are not guaranteed in any way to receive accurate information or advice. An attorney, on the other hand, has a legal and ethical obligation to provide you with accurate information and sound advice.

As noted earlier, the current economic climate keeps more people in a constant state of struggle, and many of them are turning to bankruptcy. If you decide that this option is the best one for you, hopefully this article has provided you with helpful guidance you can use to face your financial future and make positive changes.